Tag Archives: pastor

“My own congregation”

Christ the Servant 170630

Christ the Servant Lutheran Church in Vadnais Heights, MN

I am wrapping up my second interim this week and will probably start another interim later this summer.  What a joy to serve among the people of Christ the Servant and I am excited to see how they move forward in ministry with the leadership of their new pastor.

On Saturday, I was conducting a funeral and had a brief conversation with one of the attendees.  She commented on what a lovely congregation Christ the Servant is and how I must enjoy serving there. I told her yes it was a joy. I continued, “I am the interim pastor and tomorrow the congregation will vote to call a new settled pastor.”  She said, “Do you like doing interim ministry?”  I responded, “Yes, I do.”  Then she said, “Well, don’t you want to have your own church?”

Her question plucked a emotional string within me.  At one time in my ministry I definitely wanted to have “my own church.”  The thought appealed to my ego and my desire to be in charge.  However, when I had the opportunity to lead a congregation, I discovered that though I liked the title and some of the challenges in leading a congregation, my heart was restless and troubled.  Upon prayerful reflection, I learned that I was “over-identifying” with the congregation and tying my personal worth into the successes and missteps of the congregation.  When the congregation felt good, I was good; if the congregation felt down, I was down.

When I stepped into interim ministry I was able to detach these emotional strings that I had created.  As an interim pastor I have a “lighter” touch on the congregation, relying heavily on the lay leadership to guide the congregation.  I am both a consultant who comes from the outside and can observe the current behavior and mission of the congregation while also being a pastor who steps into the community to shepherd them during the interim. As my trainer said, “An interim pastor has one foot in the system and one foot outside the system.” Also my heart is not as restless and my mind is more fully engaged in the community.  I believe that this is my calling from God for this stage of my ministry.

I am thankful that God has provided a variety of gifts within the church.  I am thankful for those pastors, deacons and lay professional who can faithfully serve many years in one congregation, guiding them into deeper levels of vital ministry. I am also thankful for the calling I now have, to guide congregations through the transitions between such settle pastors.  The body of Christ needs all the gifts to be healthy and vibrant.

Now there are varieties of gifts, but the same Spirit, and there are varieties of services but the same Lord; and there are varieties of activities, but the God who activates all of them in everyone. To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit in everyone.  1 Corinthians 12:4-7

How are you using your spiritual gifts?

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5 Reasons I Support Youth Sunday

Youth Sunday WorshipYesterday was Youth Sunday at Resurrection and I was a very thankful pastor as I watched our youth sing, pray, read, welcome and preach. Here are my top five reasons for celebrating Youth Sunday.

1. The opportunity to celebrate talent. The youth of Resurrection are blessed by God with incredible talent that needs to be shared. Like any member, they could do this any Sunday, but Youth Sunday gives them the excuse or reason to do this with their peers’ support. The whole congregation, young and old, can celebrate together.

Youth Worship Band2. Parents can rejoice with their children. Parents of high school youth know that their children need to start the process of differentiation – separating from their parents. This includes making their Christian faith their own. But this can be painful for the parents to watch. The celebration of Youth Sunday gives parents a moment to see the faith being handed down to a new generation without directly pushing their children into it.

3. Young children are given aspirations and models. Young elementary age children see older siblings/peers/teenagers participate in a special way within the life of the church. This participation can spark such aspirations in them to perform in the worship band or read scripture or present the children’s message. Also parents of young children see and hear how the ministry of this congregation has impacted its youth, giving them reasons for their family to be actively involved.

4. Mentors share their gifts. Yesterday was a real celebration for John Moore, a member of our worship team, who for the past six months has coached and directed the youth band as it prepared for yesterday’s worship service. He and the band did an outstanding job. Our youth director Hannah Koehler also had the opportunity to directly mentor students as they participated in leadership roles in worship.

5. Pastor try-outs. This one is personal for me. As high school junior I had the opportunity to preach at my home congregation. Though my preaching on the “Population Bomb and Environmentalism” was strange and controversial, the affirmations I received were part of my process of discerning my call as a pastor. Though our youth can serve God’s kingdom in a wide variety of vocations (see here), the church will need good pastors, youth directors and music directors in the future and I am praying that God will call some of the youth of Resurrection Lutheran Church to serve in this way. God continues to call forth his servants to serve among us.

What are some others reasons to support Youth Sunday?

Lord Jesus, I am thankful that you call all ages to follow you, including our youth.

Clerical Collars

Clerical Collars

Last night during my class on “What’s a Lutheran?”, someone asked me why I wear a clerical collar on Sunday morning.  For them the clerical collar seemed to be Catholic.   I briefly explained that clerical collars are not necessary for me, but they help me to lead worship on Sunday morning.   I then explained the Lutheran concept of “adiaphora,” which means, “does not matter.”  Things that are adiaphora are not crucial or necessary elements of faith but rather decisions, conduct, habits that one can choose if helpful. 

An example for Lutherans would be whether or not to make the “sign of the cross,” touching their forehead, sternum and shoulders so as to remember Jesus’ death and resurrection.  Some Lutherans find it helpful in worship, others find it awkward or distracting.  I have always preached that if it helps you to focus on Christ, then do it. 

Wearing a clerical collar is adiaphora for me.  It is not essential for worship, but it helps me be mindful of my role as a pastor in the congregation.  I have been called by Resurrection Lutheran to bring the people the ministry of Word and Sacrament.   I also think it makes it very clear to any visitor what my role is.  They can quickly identify who the pastor is.  I do not see it as a status symbol, but rather my service uniform.  The clerical collar is worn by Lutherans, Episcopalian, Methodist and other clergy as well as Roman Catholic priests.

I also know that context makes a big difference.  During my internship in suburban Philadelphia I remember the tremendous respect I received when I wore my clerical collar to the hospital.  The community was predominately Roman Catholic and many assumed that I was a Catholic priest.  Nearly everyone called me “Father” and deferred to me.   But once, after making hospital calls, I went shopping with my wife at the local mall.  I remember the severe looks of disapproval from the sales clerks as I waited for my wife to try on bathing suits.  In their eyes, a priest should not be doing such things!

How do you look upon those who wear clerical collars?   Are there spiritual habits, actions or practices that you wonder if they are adiaphora or not?